KHARTOUM,
At least 185 people have been killed and 1,800 injured in three days of intense fighting between rival factions in Sudan. The United Nations special representative for Sudan, Volker Perthes, has warned that the situation is fluid and that it is difficult to predict which side will emerge victorious. The fighting has raised fears of civil war, just as Sudanese citizens were hoping to establish a democratic, civilian government after decades of military rule.

The conflict is a power struggle between General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, the commander of the armed forces, and General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, the head of the Rapid Support Forces (RSF), a paramilitary group. The two men were previously allies who jointly orchestrated an October 2021 military coup. However, the relationship between the two men soured, leading to the current conflict.

Both sides are using heavy weapons such as tanks, artillery, and fighter jets, which are causing significant damage to densely populated areas. The violence has trapped millions of people in their homes, with supplies running low in many areas. The situation is made worse by the fact that airspace and borders are closed, making it difficult for mediators to travel to the area to negotiate a truce.

The United Nations, the United States, and other countries have called for an immediate end to the hostilities. The G7 foreign ministers have condemned the fighting and urged both sides to return to negotiations without preconditions. The African Union, regional grouping IGAD, and the Arab League are also calling for a ceasefire and attempting to negotiate a truce.

Meanwhile, Sudan’s army has declared the RSF a rebel group and ordered its dissolution. However, General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo took to Twitter to call for the international community to intervene against al-Burhan, whom he branded a “radical Islamist who is bombing civilians from the air.”

The fighting has caused significant damage to hospitals in Khartoum and other cities, with some rendered completely out of service. Several hospitals in Khartoum have run out of vital supplies such as blood, transfusion equipment, and intravenous fluids.

The violence has forced terrified people to shelter in their homes, and fears are growing of a prolonged conflict that could plunge Sudan into deeper chaos. The situation is particularly concerning as Sudanese citizens were hoping to establish a civilian government after decades of military rule.

In summary, the situation in Sudan is dire, with intense fighting between rival factions causing significant damage to densely populated areas and hospitals. The international community is calling for an immediate end to the hostilities and attempting to negotiate a truce, but it remains to be seen whether a peaceful resolution can be achieved.

SOURCE -MASIMBANEWS ✍🏿

By Power

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